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gym justified III



dice out of the rabbit hole

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questions for this deadlift

I am writing them down for your convenience because the average user might ask something similar to this. In fact such questions should be asked and one should know the answers why one does some exercise a certain way.

  1. Not a deadlift day, so why did I use this exercise?
  2. How come I don’t lean back with my shoulders?
  3. Isn’t that a little bit too much of a depth deficit?
  4. Doesn’t the fat axle make this way harder?
  5. How come I didn’t use any chalk?
  6. Are 21 reps some magic number?
  7. Why don’t I slam the weights?
  8. What about mixed grip man?
  9. Touch’n go unbroken?
  10. How is it called?
  1. Not a deadlift day, so why did I use this exercise?
  2. How come I don’t lean back with my shoulders?
  3. Isn’t that a little bit t0o much of a depth deficit?
  4. Doesn’t the fat axle make this way harder?
  5. How come I didn’t use any chalk?
  6. Are 21 reps some magic number?
  7. Why don’t I slam the weights?
  8. What about mixed grip man?
  9. Touch’n go unbroken?
  10. How is it called?

The point behind those questions is, that if someone starts to dissect your workout choices and routines, you need to know the answers behinds every possible why one might come up with.

Do you know why you train like you do? Do you actually know? Should you know? If not you, who then should know? Realistically though, very very few actually know if asked.

The purpose of posting the questions was not as much to answer them, as it was to make you think. Do you just blindly follow something without actually knowing any answers why?

answers about that deadlift

I find the most logical way to describe it is fat axle deficit deadlift. Majority would recognise that what I am doing is a variation of conventional stance deadlift, this particular version being one of my favorites. It’s true that on that particular day I did not even plan to do any deadlifts but even so they can be an excellent overall warmup exercise because it activates my whole posterior chain. The deficit part demands additional stretch and more quadriceps activation, longer range of motion, making it all the more complete as a warmup choice.

fat axle, no chalk, 21 reps, etc.

I prefer to use the fat axle whenever weights lifted remain relatively low, it allows me to additionally train my grip strength. To use chalk would somewhat defeat the purpose of that grip training, especially since the weight used here is “only” 101kg. I am using a raw fat axle, 50mm thick. There is no knurling nor marking of any kind on this axle, it’s really slick — custom made to my liking. This fat axle is a little bit shorter then a regular weightlifting bar but it weighs 31kg empty, which is why the total came to be 101kg.

21 reps

Those 21 reps are of course not magical, they happened by accident as I miscounted while trying to do a warmup set of 20 reps. Touch’n go is my preferred style for deadlifts with high rep numbers — coupled with willfully lacking complete hip extension on top — which provides for more time under tension as well.

lack of full hip extension

Additional clarification regarding my lack of full hip extension. I don’t compete in neither powerlifting, CrossFit or any other sport where there are competition rules in place — where you need to sufficiently lean back with your shoulders for lift to count or to count your reps — I have no need to adhere to such regulation. Have you ever wondered why and how Olympic weightlifters do not execute deadlifts without full hip extension on top, leaning back with their shoulders? It's because — in addition creating a wrong muscle memory for the sport of weightlifting — it also creates a potential for injury as you loose some lower back tightness without any obvious benefit other then adhering to the rules of certain sport.

no mixed grip

Similarly — as I don’t compete — mixed grip also makes no sense for me. It's bad for your body as it leads to ever growing irregularities between your left/right side — which then cause new problems — adding to risk of injuries. If it were up to me I would ban mixed grip. Strongest people would remain strongest people even without mixed grip as demonstrated by strongman events where they use straps — while lifting the heaviest deadlifts — which eliminates the need for mixed grip all-together. That being said I don’t judge anyone who decides to use mixed grip, assuming they are aware of irregularities this develops and systematically work towards fixing the issues this creates.

13cm of deficit

The deficit used in the video is quite big and there is no other specific reason other than I just happen to have those jerk boxes that high by default. My flexibility allows me to use them for deadlifts, so those 13cm of depth, makes for quite a unique deficit deadlift. Such depth is quite unusual and is not something I would generally recommend. Usually you would use something like 2-3cm, stacked maybe up to 10cm at most. Long story short, deficit is great for additional range of motion, flexibility and muscle activation, improved pulling power + I prefer this version of the deadlift.

slamming the weights

As a general rule I never slam the weights. I prefer to control the weight and not the other way around. It's harder but you lift like a boss. Contrary to opinion of some, slamming shows bad manners and disrespect to equipment, to the gym and the whole gym community where you train. Slamming is never justified and dropping should only be tolerated/reserved for Olympic weightlifting.


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